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to the state department report on the september 11 attack of the u.s. consulate report -- consulate in libya that killed four americans. diplomats will speak to reporters about the report. >> on "washington journal" we will focus on gun-control issues with john yarmuth. tim helskamp will join us to talk about the fiscal cliff. and we will look at what options the administration has to tighten gun control laws with or without congressional action. our guest will be david ingram, responded for reuters. live on c-span every day at 7:00 eastern. two committees are holding hearings today on the attack in libya that killed four americans. the senate foreign relations committee will hear from deputy secretary of state at 8:00 eastern. you can see that live on c-span to. mr. burns will go to the other side of the capital of the afternoon to testify before the house foreign affairs committee about the report. that is live on c-span3 at 1:00 eastern. >> our first experience was to come and a different way than every other family up here. probably would never happen again in history. after dad was swor
ago there were only 1 billion active participants in the global economy. it was really just the u.s., western europe, and japan. today there are 4 billion people participating in the economy. we have got the same antiquated tax system today that we had 20 years ago. we should be taking the opportunity there to look this thing and say, what does it take to be globally competitive today? yes, i was on the commission, and some might think i like that proposal a lot, which i did. it does not have to be exactly like that, but there are some principles that are a part. -- that are important in there. the whole idea of during individual corporate cap gains, do it all at the same time make sense. the territorial system for companies makes sense, with clauses so that nothing -- nothing screwy happens. then we relook at all these deductions, and we should be looking at do we want all these at a time when our economy needs more flexibility to respond to a very globally different place than we had 20 years ago. it is -- to pass up this -- i think it a shame to pass up this opportunity to actual
to avoid a downgrade in the u.s. treasury debt, we need something lows to fiscal sustainability. we need to get to $3 trillion. if we fall short of that, that is a problem. >> ok. you brought up social security. to't we need more reforms make that more solvent? if we were to embark on that and set up a commission, i think there is a lot of talk of ok, we should do that. >> i think that is a perfectly reasonable way to do it. >> my colleagues said that in the near term he would rather see rates go up on the wealthiest americans because he believes it gives us a greater long-term chance to reform the tax code. do you agree with this assessment? also, do you think this is awise course? i support going back to the clinton levels. do you agree? we should look at raising taxes on the wealthiest rather than just -- >> i think we need to do both. if you are going down my path, we need both. there is no way to get to that number with tax reform alone. if you consider we will not take away a charitable deduction and if your goal is not to raise taxes from lower and middle-income houses. there is
to avoid a downgrade in the u.s. treasury debt, we need something lows to fiscal sustainability. -- close to fiscal stability. we need to get to $3 trillion. is a problem. >> ok. you brought up social security. don't we need more reforms to make that more solvent? do you see that as the money going back into social security taxif we were to embark on that and set up a commission, i think there is a lot of talk of ok, we should do that. they said the funds it should go back to social security to make it solvent. >> i think that is a perfectly reasonable way to do it. >> my colleagues said that in the near term he would rather see rates go up on the wealthiest americans because he believes it gives us a greater long-term chance to reform the tax code. do you agree with this assessment? also, do you think this is awise course? we have talked about the spending cuts and the $2.20 trillion, plus we can get $700 billion whichi support going back to the clinton levels. do you agree? has assessment was we have to look at tax rates being raised on the wealthiest instead of just looking at deductio
the comptroller general of the united states. he was also the head director of the u.s. government accountability office for almost 10 years. he is widely read and has written numerous articles on the debt and deficit. he has a new initiative which makes tremendous sense. his new group is looking at the efficiencies, inefficiencies, duplications in the government to try to find areas where we can save money without cutting. it is a very interesting initiative, one that you ought to look into and see about supporting. i hope we he will mention it briefly in his comments today. i will turn to the panel and sit-down and we will start discussing hopefully some of these issues. [inaudible] >> the short run problems of the fiscal cliff, but we're going to do with this debt and deficit issue and take time to summarize how we should look at these issues. i will start with david on the far side and move right across. >> thank you for coming. first, there are common denominators between the challenges at the federal, state, and local levels. some are inadequate but the controls, escalating health care cost
work in the u.s. house of representatives in 1978, in the office of the general clerk under then majority leader john rhodes. where he learned the intricacies of the house and legislative procedures while keeping official minutes in this chamber. in 1979 he began working in the republican cloakroom where he remained for seven years before beginning a new position as floor assistance it -- floor assistant to the republican leader in 1986. since then jay has served as floor assistant to three speakers of the house, including newt gingrich, dennis hastert and the current speaker, john boehner. the career that has spanned over 35 years, jay has served as an invaluable role for so many members in helping them to learn the ways of the u.s. house of representatives. i'm proud to be among those who have benefited from jay's service and friendship and leadership. but jay isn't just known for his expertise in parliamentary procedure. he's known to be an individual of substance and distinct professionalism. in fact, i personally would say he's the embodiment of a professional which is
didn'tou deal with the sequester earlier in i said, you mean like back in may when the u.s. house paed the only sequester replacement bill to be passed in this town. back in may. they said maybe that takes care of the sequester problem. think said what about the tax rates? i said what about in august new york a bipartisan way, we passed a bill, in this house, to extend current tax rates, to prevent tax rates from going up. i took another question from up with of the folks who said, but what about that senate bill people keep talking about? what about the senate bl? why won't that get a vote in the house. i said actually quite unusual in the rules committee you don't see it often but rules committee waived all the points of order, took all the roadblocks out of the way, in an unprecedented way to allow what we called the levin amendment, which was basically exactly the plan the president has been pushing, to raise toongs family-owned businesses, to punish job creator well, took that vote on the house floor. i'm proud to say that again in a bipartisan way republicans and democrats came t
that received 53 democratic votes in the u.s. senate only two years ago and the spending reduction saket serious start toward reducing our deficit and protecting our national security. abs president a balanced offer from the president this is our best option and senate democrats should take up both of these measures immediately. the president has a choice mr. speaker, he can support these measures or be responsible for reckless spending and the largest tax hike in american history. and i yield back. >> thank you mr. speaker, what is unbalance sd the republican package that we see on the floor today. we already talked about the numbers of the republican plan b tax proposal which compared to going over the fiscal cliff and the senate alternative would actually provide millionaires with a $50,000 tax cut on average while 25 million american families will actually see a tax increase of $1,000 on average, including, mr. speaker, some of our soldiers on the front line in afghanistan today. and majority leader talked about doing the math. do the math on the tax plan because that's exactly what it shows
-dollar tax increase in u.s. history. it increases taxes on nearly one million small businesses in the middle of a jobs crisis. according to ernst & young, this type of rate hike would cause more than 700,000 americans to lose their jobs. it raises taxes on investment income, harming economic growth even more. it includes tens of billions of dollars in more washington spending in a deal supposedly to cut the deficit. and most outrageous of all, it gives the president of the united states unilateral power to raise the limit on the federal credit card, the so-called debt ceiling, whenever he wants or as much as he wants. and while i'm flattered the administration has taken to calling this the -- quote -- "mcconnell provision" they seemed to have forgotten how this worked in the budget control act. we gave the president the authority then to request a debt ceiling increase, but that was only after the white house agreed to $2 trillion in cuts to washington spending and agreed to be bound by the timing and amount set by congress. this time the request is for the president to have the ability to r
the financial crisis may have reduced the underlying potential growth rate of the u.s. economy. it has interfered with business creation, investment, advances, and so on which can account for at least part of the somewhat slower growth. at the same time, what monetary policy influences is not the underlying structural growth in bank that is for many other different types of policies. monetary policy affects primarily the state of the business cycle, excess unemployment, or the extent of the recession in the economy. there we also under estimated the recession but we have been much closer there. i think therefore we have been able to address that somewhat more effectively with quite accommodative policies. that being said, of course, we have over time as we have seen disappointments in growth and job creation, as we did in september we have added accommodation and we continue to reassess the outlook. i think it is only fair to say that economic forecasting beyond a few quarters is very, very difficult. what we are trying to do is create a plausible scenario which we think it is reasonab
of manufacturing in the u.s. washington journal, live every morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> house speaker john boehner today proposed letting tax rates go up on income above $1 million as a short-term step to avoid some of the fiscal cliff. the white house and democratic leaders rejected his offer. we will hear from speaker boehner next. we will also get reaction from democratic house members and senators and later, a news conference with the brady campaign to prevent gun violence. >> our first experience was to come in a different way than every family up here. after dad was sworn in, we took a picture of the family behind the oval office desk. that night, we did not get to move into the white house because nixon have left so quickly, they left their doctor -- daughter and son in law to pack all their clothes and belongings. we had to go back to our little house in alexandria, virginia. the neighborhood was surrounded by secret service. we had in the boehner -- we had been living there. that night, mom was cooking dinner. we were sitting around the dinner table and she looks over
a factory in china and sell cars. they can delay paying u.s. taxes on that indefinitely. but the money comes from the rent, as so-called passive income, they have to pay taxes on that immediately. this provision says if your a bank -- you can be late paying your taxes. it is going to be considered active income. it is quite valuable to them. it is kind of a gray area. in 1986 when they did big tax reform, they said that is active income and we should tax that money. host: we have been talking with sam goldfarb from cq roll call. thank you very much. >> explores the history and literary culture of all money -- of albany. tonight on c-span, a senate debate on the fiscal cliff. shaun donovan discusses it. harry reid and mitch mcconnell when back-and-forth on fiscal cliff issues and a proposal to raise the debt ceiling. here is part of their exchange. >> yesterday afternoon, i came to the floor and offered president obama's proposal on the fiscal cliff to show that neither he nor democrats in congress are acting in good faith in these negotiations. with just a few weeks ago before a potentially
of the republican study committee of the u.s. congress. we are privileged to host this event, to welcome the incoming chairman, and to thank the outgoing chairman, for their service. this is a special friendship between aei and the irs see that we have cultivated, which has been very rewarding for us. it is very unusual to have an event like this, with the outgoing and incoming leaders, for any organization. but the nature of these leaders makes it more likely than what we would see with most other organizations. the republican study committee -- this is language from the charter. i will read it, because i think it speaks volumes about what they are trying to achieve. the committee was founded to serve as an ideological rallying point, where conservatives can stand on the basis of principle, were committed men and women without formal leadership positions can affect a change on their first state in congress, a coming up with a sound policy idea and by articulating a powerful position. it is a friendship we have cultivated for years, especially with executive director paul keller, a great
of south carolina ignored. [laughter] all kidding aside, when i was running for the u.s. senate, and very few people believed i could win, most of the people who believed i could win lived in my home. [laughter] four of them were under the age of 10. paul ryan was one of the only people in washington who came to my assistance. i will never forget that. thank you very much. [laughter] [applause] i am so honored tonight. i think as though everyone's comments here when i say we should -- we could sure use jack kemp right now. [applause] sadly, jack kemp is not here. the ideas and principles behind him are. they are useful to us as we begin to confront the great economic challenges and opportunities our nation currently faces. the existence of a large and vibrant american middle class goes to the very essence of the american exceptional identity. every country in the world has rich people. only a few places have achieved a vibrant middle class. in the history of the world, none has been more vibrant and more stable than the great american middle class. one of the fundamental promises of ameri
for the next 50 years. we have to deal with it. >> we have four minutes left. with regard to the state of the u.s. economy, you have some important votes cast before the lame-duck session is over. what is your level of confidence about the future of the u.s. economy right now? >> i am not really optimistic. we have a short-term solution. the president wants to spend more money. i understand that. he also wants to raise taxes on people over to rudder jetty thousand dollars and he will get part of that -- $250,000 and he will get part of that. he will have a bill that says we have to give everyone a tax cut, who will vote against that? he has the ability to wait. we are trillions of dollars in the hole. not just $16 trillion but 6070 -- $60 trillion or $70 trillion. we will have a severe economic problem. i hope i am wrong. i hope there is a solution. unless something radical changes, we will see a severe economic problems and high inflation. >> you made the decision not to run again. what will you miss most about congress? >> i will miss the camaraderie. i was one of the founders of the republican
that at 9:15, i look at how the u.s. population is expected to u.s. population is expected to change over the
the september 11 attacks on the u.s. mission in benghazi, libya. that is live thursday at 1:00 p.m. eastern on cspan 3. the two connecticut u.s. senators talked about last week's school shootings in newtown, conn.. this is 40 minutes. >> mr. president, we appear to be in one of those periods of time where we are working too often through the valley of the shadow of death. senator blumenthal and i've come to the floor to speak about the tragedy that occurred, the senseless horrific attacks on innocent people in newtown, conn.. last friday. we must also note with extraordinary respect and sense of loss the death of our truly beloved colleague, senator dan inouye of hawaii. america, as senator reid and senator durbin made so car, america has lost a true hero, a patriot. this senate has lost a great leader, a leader whose accomplishments have been literally historic, and i think all of us have lost a friend. last evening, senator akaka spoke about how dan inouye's legacy, i'm paraphrasing here, was all aund hawi and all he had done for the state. the truth is that i think mt every state in the
-1970's and 2008. the u.s. utilizing its trade deficit with the rest of the world has been operating like a huge vacuum cleaner. sucking into the united states the net exports of europe, japan, and lately china. thus providing exporters -- germany, japan, or china -- with the requisite demand necessary. so, the ever expanding trade deficit was not an accident. it was a very clever way of replacing one that surplus recycling system with another. the first one, it was one where america had a surplus and america decided instead of doing what germany is doing at the moment -- which is cutting its nose to spite its face, and thereby entering into recession by cutting, cutting, cutting -- volcker as the head of the fed had a different idea. we are going to expand our dominance and our wealth by expanding our deficit and using our deficits to provide the rest of the world with the demand which is necessary to grow their economies, even at the expense of ours. and who is going to pay for the deficit? if i have an ever-expanding deficit, the bank tells me it is game over. but if you are the u
. then, an explanation of home ownership in the u.s., hit by the author of "american nightmare." and discussions on the economy, poverty, and hunger. we'll hear from the head of u.s. economic officer service, and the urban institute's senior fellow. california republican congressman jerry lewis is retiring from the house after 34 years in office. the 17 term congressman represents the 41st district in southeastern california, which includes parts of san bernardino and riverside county. this interview is 30 minutes. >> congressmen jerry lewis, you are leaving after three plus decades here. in what ways is this institution different than when you joined? >> there have been many changes. the most significant difficulty with those changes is we have tended recently to more and more polarized ourselves. there is a tendency to want to paint everything in partisan terms. 90% of the issues we deal with have nothing to do with partisan politics. we are here to attempt to respond to our constituency needs in a way that reflects their priorities. the partisanship has gotten in the way of
, through new year's day. >> j. larry 3, new hampshire will become the first state in u.s. history to be represented in congress entirely by women. they just elected the second woman governor in its history. the women holding the top political offices gathered for a discussion in manchester, new hampshire. this is just over an hour. >> on to the program -- just a little bit on the way the questions were developed for today's event. this is a little bit of an atypical chamber event. questions were developed with input from the chamber's board of directors and the new hampshire women's initiative. there is centered not around issues but around this moment of history. the mission is to celebrate the first in the nation status that new hampshire has by holding this event today. rabin will facilitate a conversation about what this moment in time means to these five women. this power will go so fast. i am sure, and i hope, that this conversation leaves you hungry for more. please, share today with your friends, your children, your co-workers. we will have dvd's available. please share th
the house, but i remain proud of our bipartisan effort for which the u.s.a. today called us the brave 38. and i believe this type of thoughtful independent leadership that this is the type of leadership that the 10th district deserves. i also believe that the courage and leadership shown by the house to take on the difficult, but necessary position of reining entitlement spending deserves recognition. we know that medicare stands out as a primary driver of our debt in the future. and unfortunately, this future is not so far off. with one of medicare's key programs scheduled to go bankrupt in the next 10 to 12 years, sustaining the status quo means dramatic cuts down the road on the vulnerable americans who need the program the most, crippling increases to the debt and most likely both. instead, i believe we have a generational obligation to ensure that our children's potential is not crossed by a debt burden borne out of the inability to govern responsebly. medicare reform requires broad bipartisan support so we are not there yet. we are not. i do want to express my appreciation to democ
. and the formula for paying doctors under medicare. later, how the u.s. population is expected to change or the next 50 years. jennifer, a demographer, and william, a demographer for the brookings institution. live starting at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the white house was very controversial. the person who designed washington city, there was competition. he submitted a design for a palace. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly are inspiring. a european diplomat told the congress it was neither large nor of inspiring. but the answer. the congressman dave said, the building served a purpose. if it were larger and more elegant, perhaps some president would be inclined to become a permanent resident. >> vicki goldberg has gathered a few of her favorite photos in the president's home and photographs and history. watch at 7:30 on american history tv. john boehner's office described a meeting with president obama as a frank talk. he spoke to reporters about fiscal cliff negotiations, criticizing president obama for not being serious on cutting spending and lending he
% -- 100% of u.s. taxpayers get a tax cut. above $250,000, people making more than $250,000 a year will be asked to pay a little more to pay for the fiscal soundness of our country, to pay for our country, the support of our troops. the pillars of security for our seniors. the education of our children. for the safety of our neighborhoods. this is just asking them to pay a little bit more while they continue to get the same tax cuts that everyone does. 100% of the american people get a tax cut, the upper 2% are asked to pay a little bit more. so i thank the speaker for finally at least uttering the words on the floor of the house about what is -- what the decisions are that need to be made. again, we committed to the cut. we acted upon the entitlements. the president has more in his budget. all of this would be a down payment for as we go rward into the next session of congress to talk about tax simplification and fairness, how we can have lower rates while plugging up loopholes and having a tax code that is -- encourages growth in our country. but that's along the scussion. as we
about the estate tax. a lot of politics in the u.s. senate over the estate tax. could this deal blow up over the estate tax? >> maryland has been known to do very aggressive things on the floor of the senate. have think of end up with a split -- with an estate tax of one to run number barry wants it to be at. >> really? we have about a minute or so left. anyone else want to weigh in? you have a unique opportunity. the president, john boehner, could be getting set to talk again later this week. what advice would you give them on taxes? >> these are very minor issues, in terms of total revenue derived. but they are very significant to members. if you were to tell the bulk of the democratic caucus in the house that we were going to do something draconian to the inheritance tax, that could cost you a lot of votes. this is a carefully crafted a balanced package the house to emerge. all these issues need to be tested. a little focus group on the conference side. these can be symbolically important. they can blow the opportunity to do something broadbased and fundamental. do we end up with som
not adjusted. the economy did well. do we end with the view that the u.s. is the best performing of the advanced economies? >> the u.s. has a pretty good medium-term growth prospects. both because of the energy boom, increasing efficiencies and healthcare, and still being the world leader in technology, which is a big advantage. the other point that i think needs more emphasis, if you look over the next 10-20 years, the growth rate of the economy is slowing because of demographics, because the average education is not increasing and we will have the drag from the aftermath of the financial crisis for a long time. the next year or two or three looks better than what we have been experiencing that better means 3% growth, not 5%. >> on that note, are there any questions? no questions? i have loads more. >> [inaudible] >> can we continue to print money without causing inflation? >> one of the most challenging lines that the next chairman of the federal reserve will have to walk is unwinding the balance sheet expansion that has occurred while avoiding putting too much negative pressur
on the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya, that killed four americans. the senate foreign relations committee will hear from william burns and others preconceived that live on c-span. mr. vernes will go to the other side of capitol hill to testify about the benghazi report. that is live on c-span3 at 1:00 p.m. eastern. >> if you work for him, you would get a mercurial, sometimes generous, sometimes overbearing, boss.imes almost cruel los he did not know how to apologize. which men of his age and class are not going to apologize to gone private secretary or typist. he had a way of sort of turning the tables and his version of an apology would be to say, actually i am a very kind man and you were doing a very good job today. the issue was never settled. he always had to get the last word in. one night going through what hall, a german bomb fell nearby. he should not have been out at all. his bodyguard pushed him into a doorway and a couple of thompson's men were actually slightly wounded. churchill did not like to be touched. he said thompson, don't do that. thompson said sir, you sho
. they are professionals and patriots. they serve in places where there is little or no u.s. presence. i trust them with my life. it is important to recognize that our colleagues and across the department at home and abroad get it right list times for years on end on some of the top the circumstances imaginable. he cannot lose sight of that. -- we cannot lose sight of that. we have to do better. be open to our colleagues who lost their lives in benghazi. -- we owe it to our colleagues who lost their lives in benghazi. thousands of our colleagues are serving america in diplomatic posts around the world. we will never forget every act of terrorism and we'll never stop working to make things better and safer. the united states will keep leading and engaging around the world, including in those hard places where america's interests -- thank you very much. >> mr. chairman, senator lugar, members of the committee, i also want to thank you for this opportunity. all of us have a responsibility to provide the men and women who have served this country with the best possible security and support. the supervisors hav
that -- it is true that china is doing very well economically, but increasingly, many students are coming to the u.s. to study. they feel they're part of the -- they feel that china is divided. he is starting to become a strong leader. the xi jinpingthat is a dilemma. if china's leaders become very strong, it is a bigger dilemma. it is better for china. where the security system becomes stronger. those are the two questions. the first is whether china is a part of the global problems or part of the global solutions. it is not just chinese problem. according to people in the economic world. >> you are getting beyond me. i can not see it as a china problem or an american problem. i can see it as a human problem. if you could find a way to have a society without conflicts, that should be what you do. ultimately, law and courts are ways of resolving conflicts among human beings. a good way to do that or people with simple tribes. -- when people were simple tribes of 200 people and they were wandering in the desert,they could solve their problems by having someone -- even then, they had problems. they wo
of church and state. it's in the constitution of the u.s.s.r. it's not in our constitution. second thing i came here to the floor to talk about when the debate was raging was the ethical stem cell procurement. remember when george bush came to office, there was a lot of research in stem cells and we have been using adult stem cells but i'm probably the only member of congress that has a agree in advanced embriology and they thought there ought to be more usefulness in stem cells because they are pretty potent and will develop into anything. and get to adult stem cells that is differentiated and somewhat limited in what you can do with it. get these embryonic stem cells that were destroying the embryo. 40,000 embryos are discarded because they won't pay for keeping them. they are frozen and discadded and the argument is you can take one of these discarded embryos and you can crush it and get the stem cells from it. before you do that, you look at it under the microscope and there you see it, living tissue. gee, that might be the next albert einstein. when you are talking about collectively
cliff. our guest will be damian paletta. then homeownership in the u.s. with randallo tool. later, the discussion of the economy, poverty, and hunger. caroline radcliff. "washington journal" live every morning starting at 7:00 eastern on c-span. >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces that are bringing about this suffering. >> the white house is a pulpit and you ought to take advantage of it. >> obesity in this country is nothing short of a public health crisis. >> i think i have little antennas that went up and told me when somebody had their own agenda. >> there is so much influence in that office and it is shame to waste it. >> they serve on a window on the past with what is going on with american women. >> sh she is the only one they can trust. >> many of the women were writers. they were journalist, they wrote books. >> they are more interesting as human beings than their husbands. if only because they are not first and foremost defined and limited by political ambition. >> dolly was social adept and politically savvy. >> dolly madiso
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)